The Case for California Compliance

People often ask us, "What makes your grip featureless?" Here we will answer that question, as quickly and easily as possible.

(Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer; this isn't legal advice; I'm not liable for anything that may happen as a result of applying this information.)

Like other similar grips, we based our design off the 2010 court case, The People vs. Haack and Haack, in which a DOJ expert approved several featureless products.

Here is an excerpt from the court transcript:

The question, in bold, is referring to the Exile Hammerhead. To paraphrase the question, if grasping the Hammerhead with the thumb wrapped over the top of the grip, underneath the buffer tube, is that a pistol grip?


The DOJ Agent responds, no, because the grip goes straight-back from the top of the trigger, keeping the hand in a compliant position.

Here is the exile Hammerhead, with a line drawn back from the top of the trigger:


We designed our grip to be featureless for the same reason:

In summary, from a legal perspective, our grip is like a much more ergonomic version of the Exile Hammerhead.